by number one, 25 February 2011

$Album album cover
Perhaps the Screaming Trees' most notable achievement to date has been their spectacular failure to cash in on the early 90's grunge scene. Having formed in 1985, the band were well established locally when the grunge train came to Seattle, and inevitably signed with the first frothy-mouthed record-label executive to barge into one of their dingy gigs frantically searching for the next Nirvana...



by number two, 14 February 2011

$Album album cover
Live and Dangerous is the first live concert offering from Irish rockers Thin Lizzy, a curious bunch of idle-witted simpletons, second in repute only to Sir Bob Geldof in the dubious list of Irish rock legends. Having found fame through the diddley-di nonsense of Whiskey in the Jar, a song more suited to the Darby O'Gill soundtrack than mainstream pop, the band abandoned their traditional Irish roots...



by number one, 17 January 2011

$Album album cover
Having opportunistically hopped on the britpop bandwagon, Oasis introduced themselves to the world by releasing the fastest selling UK debut album of all time - more likely a sign of increasing music industry sales across the board than an endorsement of their questionable talent. With a live act reminiscent of an evening spent at Madame Tussauds wearing headphones...



by number two, 3 January 2011

$Album album cover
Hatful of Hollow is the second "album" release by Mancunian minstrels The Smiths. Ostensibly a compilation of tracks recorded with state broadcaster BBC, it is in fact a rather transparent attempt to re-record their appalling debut album The Smiths, the obvious futility of which being comparable to trying to rescue a fallen meringue. No fewer than 6 of the tracks on that record, along with the band personnel...



by number one, 6 December 2010

$Album album cover
Pearl Jam's last album, No Code, bore the wrath of the musical press with widespread criticism of its change in artistic direction and curious experimentalism. Yield presents a rather meek response to those detractors, in the form of an unconditional surrender and a shameless regression to a more radio-friendly formula. Meanwhile, the boycott of promoters Ticketmaster due to ticket handling fees...



by number two, 29 November 2010

$Album album cover
This marks the third and final album release by Jimi Hendrix, a scamp made good who achieved an extensive cult following as a guitar hero and the overt manifestation of all that was wrong with the 60's hippy movement. Hailing from Seattle, a cultural backwater notable mainly for its logging industry, Hendrix's path to fame encompassed stints in the military, which he deserted for no good reason...



by number one, 22 November 2010

$Album album cover
The "new" Faith No More is back, this time with a considerable weight of expectation on their shoulders due to the surprise commercial success of their last album, The Real Thing. Mike Patton joining the band to record that album in 1989 may have looked somewhat like a merger of a talented singer with an established musical act, but with his increasing control on all aspects of their output...



by number two, 15 November 2010

$Album album cover
Born in the USA marks the seventh release from New Jersey songster Bruce Springsteen, self-appointed champion of the American proletariat. While the title of his breakthrough, Born to Run, might have been more appropriate for an athlete than a musician, Born in the USA also references his origin but treads safer ground by informing us of the location of this seminal event...



by number one, 8 November 2010

$Album album cover
On paper, Soundgarden's line-up looks like some sort of musical dream-team, with Grammy winning vocalist Chris Cornell up front, flanked by Kim Thayil, one time Rolling Stone's greatest guitarist of all time, and Matt Cameron, a regular appearance on various top 100 drummer lists. Ben Shepherd is also back there somewhere on bass guitar. But, like a ludicrously expensive football squad...



by number two, 1 November 2010

$Album album cover
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan is the sophomore effort from fabled troubadour Bob Dylan, a man who carved the template for cynical and soul-less exploitation of the masses. Perhaps the first manufactured music star, every aspect of his artistic persona was calculated to elevate him to folk-hero status. Tousled unkempt hair - check. Waif-like impish appearance - check. Anti-war ideology - check...



by number one, 25 October 2010

$Album album cover
This is the Chilis' highly anticipated seventh album, which, disregarding the intervening Jane's Addiction tribute album One Hot Minute, can be seen as a follow-up to their mainstream breakthrough Blood Sugar Sex Magik. Having seemingly found some stability in the rhythm section with drummer Chad Smith surviving an unprecedented three records, the band's strong indecisiveness on guitarists hasn't faltered...



by number two, 18 October 2010

$Album album cover
Plastic Ono Band finds former mop-top John Lennon striking out "on his own" for the first time on what is widely described as his "primal scream" album, in reference to the therapy he received just prior to its recording. Having supposedly tired of making music with his childhood friends in the Beatles, he proceeded to make an album at the Fab Four's hangout Abbey Road studios...



by number one, 11 October 2010

$Album album cover
Nirvana were fortunate enough to take a relatively straightforward path to success, nurtured through their early years and first album by Seattle feeder-label Sub Pop records. Their subsequent rapid rise to international stardom was a carefully orchestrated affair, choreographed by billionaire puppet master David Geffen. Geffen's re-shuffle of tertiary band members ...



by number two, 4 October 2010

$Album album cover
This is the eighth (yes, eighth!) solo album from guitar slinger Rory Gallagher, another leftover from the heady 70's days of the best forgotten British Blues Rock movement. On this 46 minute set Gallagher is accompanied by fellow Northern Irishman and trusted 4-string wizard Gerry McAvoy. The guitarist appears to have employed more drummers than Spinal Tap, and Ted McKenna temporarily wields the sticks...




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